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by Amy and David Goodman

Talk about shock and awe!

Just when you thought you’d heard it all, Amy and David Goodman present one example after another of political corruption, propaganda and incompetence that the mainstream media refuses adequately to cover.

Along with the facts, Amy and David provide analyses that cut to the core in a way the corporate media never does.

In discussing Katrina, for example, they sum up the debacle by noting that the administration is run by anti-government zealots who have generated a self-fulfilling prophecy by having to rely on inept political hacks they appointed to head federal agencies they gutted.

They also demonstrate the complicity of the media which continues to provide cover for a rogue administration unconcerned with legal requirements.

In December, 2005, the NY Times published a shocking exposé which revealed that the Bush administration was engaged in domestic wiretapping of American citizens in direct violation of FISA, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978.  This report caused an uproar and even some calls for impeachment.  But the most interesting part of the story came in the 9th paragraph when the Times revealed they had delayed publishing this report for over a year after senior administration officials claimed that doing so would aid the terrorists.  Times executive editor Bill Keller attempted to explain why the story was delayed for so long, citing administration claims that a variety of legal checks had been imposed that satisfied everyone involved that the program raised no legal questions.

One cannot help but moan over the level of naiveté necessary to believe that this wiretapping raised no legal questions based on the assertions of an administration that had lied so many times in their efforts to invade Iraq.  Going back just over a year from December, 2005, we see that the 2004 election was taking place.

Imagine the difference if this story had come out when it was first known.

But driving us closer to despair is clearly not the Goodmans’ intent as the last portion of the book is devoted to those who speak up and speak out against the lies.

Most of us have by now heard the story of Cindy Sheehan, a typical mother who became extraordinary after the death of her son Casey.  From her first tentative efforts to talk about her grief, this one woman created a media cyclone by camping out at Bush’s Crawford, Texas, “ranch” vowing to stay until Bush would meet with her to explain for what noble cause her son had died.

Cindy and other ordinary folks who have raised their voices in opposition to the lies our government spews, often at high personal costs, need our support as much as our troops.  We can do this not by succumbing to despair, but by renewing our commitment to do what we can to bring about a just and peaceful world.

Reviewed by Mark Phillips